Monthly Archives: April 2011

Want to Help Make Computer Science History?

What were the major events in the history of computer science? MIT’s Scott Aaronson would like to know your opinion: Continue reading…

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New Wanderings for May

The Feature for this month’s New Wanderings contains a collection of links to DIY Sub Atomic Particle and Radiation Detectors. Continue reading…

Posted in Amateur Science, Wanderings | 1 Comment

Heat Treating Part II

I Finished assembling the controller for the heat treating oven. Everything is assembled into a small aluminum box. For the AC power connections I got a short heavy duty extension cord and cut it in half. One half to plug it in and the other half to plug in the oven being controlled. The controller itself is mounted in the front of the box along with a power switch. Continue reading…

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This Week at Hilton Pond: “Signs of Middle Spring 2011, Part 2”

The wonders of “Middle Spring” continue to appear at Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History, from Wood Ducks to Cricket Frogs and Sourgrass to Cinquefoils. To view a whole new batch of vernal flora and fauna in our latest photo essay for 11-21 April 2011, please visit http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek110411.html. Continue reading…

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Another Call for Citizen Scientists

It’s remarkable how the number of projects conducted by or calling for citizen scientists continues to grow. News of one recent example comes to us from Greenwich, CT, where environmental scientist Dr. Alan Kolok has recruited a team of some 50 citizen scientists to assist in a project for tracking the behavior of atrazine, a common herbicide, as it moves through the Elkhorn River basin in Nebraska. Continue reading…

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Citizen Science Making Strides Down Under

One of the best known citizen science programs in Australia is the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s national network of more than 6000 volunteer weather watchers. Strategically located around the nation, these residents record information on rainfall levels, developing storms, river height and sea conditions for the bureau’s weather databases. Continue reading…

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This Week at Hilton Pond: “Signs of Middle Spring 2011”

“This Week at Hilton Pond” we’re so far into vernal occurrences we decided to call the season “middle spring,” and there was plenty of floral and faunal activity to indicate winter is definitely over. Continue reading…

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Second Life as a Citizen Science Venue

Not that long ago, “virtual reality” was one of the hottest buzzwords in Silicon Valley. Then the hype faded when recreating reality in the cyberworld turned out to be harder than it looked. But the VR scene has not disappeared. Education has long been a proposed use for virtual worlds, and now citizen science in cyberworlds is apparently on its way. Continue reading…

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Japan’s Second Encounter with Nuclear Radiation

The Second World War came to a quick end after the US exploded two atomic bombs over Japan.

History’s first atomic bomb was detonated from atop a steel tower in the New Mexico desert before sunrise on July 16, 1945. “Little Boy”, the second atomic bomb, was dropped by a B-29 over Hiroshima on August 6. The blast obliterated much of the city of Hiroshima and instantly killed some 70,000 people. Another 50,000 died from injuries, burns and radiation. Continue reading…

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More on Pen and Pencil Science

Last week I posted about the art of the field sketch (“Paper, Pencil, Pen, Brush: The Lost Art of Field Sketching”) and how learning to sketch out in nature is a tool well worth learning. My reason for recommending that one acquire such skills is because drawing something by hand is an excellent way to acquire a good mental picture of what you draw. Continue reading…

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