This Week at Hilton Pond (1-15 January 2013)—“Blue Jays, Cyanocitta cristata: Maligned But Most Important”

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Posted on 28 January 2013 by Bill Hilton Jr.

Due to illness I’ve fallen a bit behind on “This Week at Hilton Pond” installments, but I finally finished the one for 1-15 January 2013. It’s a photo essay about a bird disliked by many backyard birders but that plays several important ecological roles. I speak here of the Blue Jay—that big, boisterous, and brightly colored corvid that can brighten a winter dismal day with plumage and behavior. To read about this maligned but valuable native species, please visit http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek130101.html. If you like, please forward the link to others who might be interested.

Don’t forget to scroll down for the usual list of birds banded and recaptured during the period, as well as a few miscellaneous notes and acknowledgement for some recent contributors to the education, research, and conservation efforts of Hilton Pond Center.

Happy (Midwinter) Nature Watching!

BILL

P.S. Please "Like" our new Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond for timely updates on nature topics.

Figure 1. The Blue Jay, Cyanocitta cristata, plays many important ecological roles in woodland and savannah habitats across eastern North America.  (Photo copyright Bill Hilton Jr.)

Figure 1. The Blue Jay, Cyanocitta cristata, plays many important ecological roles in woodland and savannah habitats across eastern North America. (Photo copyright Bill Hilton Jr.)

 

 

Bill Hilton Jr. is an award-winning educator-naturalist and executive director of non-profit Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History near York, South Carolina USA, where he has banded more than 58,100 birds since 1982. He is the only scientist conducting long-term studies of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) on their wintering grounds in Central America. Check out his Web sites for Hilton Pond Center at www.hiltonpond.org and “Operation RubyThroat: the Hummingbird Project” at www.rubythroat.org

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