Category Archives: Psychology

The science of the mind and how it works.

Citizen Science Musings: Care and Feeding of the Idea Stream

Keplers-books

It was a stimulating evening, with wide-ranging conversation; something that my current situation does not allow as often as I could wish. One of the more pleasant aspects was that several thoughts occurred to me that might not have done so otherwise. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Citizen Science Musings, Community, General Interest, Makers and Making, Psychology, Science Education | 1 Comment

Citizen Science Musings: The Night My Cat and I Played Chess

Inanna. USCF Rating: Unknown. Photo by Sheldon Greaves.

To help myself wind down, I got our a small chess set and prepared to go through a game from one of my chess books. Just before I started, Inanna hopped up on the bed and sat down on the black side of the board opposite me, and looked at me inquisitively. Continue reading…

Posted in Amateur Science, Citizen Science Musings, Evolution, General Interest, Psychology, Stories | 1 Comment

What Makes Citizen Scientists Tick?

Citizen science, in which volunteers work with professional scientists to conduct research, is expanding due to large online datasets. To plan projects, it is important to understand volunteers’ motivations for participating. Continue reading…

Posted in Amateur Science, Breaking News, Community, Education, Psychology, Science Education | Leave a comment

What Are We Missing?

The scientific enterprise demands a delicate balancing act between careful and accurate observations and the ability to spot the unexpected items that can lead to fresh discoveries. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Evolution, Experimentation, General Interest, Observation, Psychology, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Schizophrenia

Image: left-religion.livejournal.com/

Schizophrenia is a chronic mental illness in which an afflicted person loses touch with reality. Continue reading…

Posted in Biology, Psychology | Leave a comment

Citizen Science Musings: Learning In Place

The "new" desk made from two filing cabinets and a salvaged particle board desk top.

My office is where I work, obviously, but it’s also one of the places where I learn. For me, personally, this is a very important part of my life. To me, learning spaces are Holy Ground, even if they aren’t places I use personally. Continue reading…

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Citizen Science Musings: Using the Hypothesis

Richards J. Heuer

Heuer’s book is designed to identify the cultural, educational, psychological and, in some cases, the physiological limitations and barriers that prevent intelligence analysts from working effectively. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Citizen Science Musings, Experimentation, Psychology, Science Education | 1 Comment

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: CSL Publishes Its First Book!

THUMBNAIL_IMAGE

How do the great discoverers of science really work? Biographers, psychologists, and philosophers have written much on the phenomenon of scientific creativity. This collection of essays takes you into the minds of some of the world’s greatest scientists. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Breaking News, CSL News, General Interest, Psychology, Publishing, Science Education | 1 Comment

Citizen Science Musings: Finding the Words

kopie-von-ernst-cassirer

In one of his essays he talks about the problem of why the “two cultures” (after E. P. Snow) had such difficulty communicating with each other. Cassirer suggested that language itself might be the problem, as it developed out of a decidedly non-scientific cultural background and remains today laden with features such as non-empirical metaphors, etc. that render it too imprecise to reliably communicate scientific truths. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Citizen Science Musings, Community, Education, Psychology, Science Education, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Citizen Science: Thousands Tested Their “Gut” Sense for Numbers

numbers

A first-of-its kind study using the World Wide Web to collect data from more than 10,000 study subjects ages 11 to 85 found that humans’ inborn “number sense” improves during school years, declines during old age, and remains linked throughout the entire lifespan to academic mathematics achievement. Continue reading…

Posted in Education, Mathematics, Psychology | Leave a comment