Category Archives: Statistics

The Economist: How Science Goes Wrong

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A SIMPLE idea underpins science: “trust, but verify”. Results should always be subject to challenge from experiment. That simple but powerful idea has generated a vast body of knowledge. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Community, Ethics, Experimentation, General Interest, History of Science, Open Science, Publishing, Statistics | Leave a comment

A New Approach to Publishing Scientific Data

We’ve covered the issue of access to scientific literature by non-professional, but a similar problem exists in the area of data. Now a new website, figshare.com provides a potentially game-changing service. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Breaking News, Open Science, Publishing, Research Tools, Statistics | 1 Comment

Rev. Thomas Bayes: Amateur Mathematician

A US expert says a Welsh clergyman and amateur mathematician should be more widely recognised for his work on a vital probability equation still in use today. Continue reading…

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Beware Faulty Statistical Methods

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Thoughtful experts have been pointing out serious flaws in standard statistical methods for decades. In recent years, the depth of the problem has become more apparent and more well-documented. Continue reading…

Posted in Best Practices, Experimentation, Mathematics, Measurement, Observation, Statistics, Tools | Leave a comment

Data Management Guide for Citizen Scientists released

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The Public Participation in Science Research working group today released their Data Management Guide designed specifically for citizen scientists. Continue reading…

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Benford’s Law

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In 1881, when scientists still used logarithm tables, a particularly observant astronomer named Simon Newcomb noticed that the pages in the beginning of the books of log tables were more worn than the pages at the end. Continue reading…

Posted in Mathematics, Statistics | 1 Comment